Restart Network: Providing world-class tech education to underserved communities

Restart Network: Providing world-class tech education to underserved communities

For Romanian-born Teodor Cătăniciu, everything started with an eye-opening experience. A few years back, he was a business student at a Dutch university only to realize that the program he had chosen wasn’t given him enough real-world knowledge. He wanted more.

Travis the Translator: Digitizing languages to bring people closer together

Travis the Translator: Digitizing languages to bring people closer together

There are close to 7,000 languages being spoken around the world, and a single person may be fluent in one or two, perhaps three. Language barriers are, thus, rather common – whether people deal with personal or professional matters.

InnovationQuarter: The investing powerhouse

InnovationQuarter: The investing powerhouse

Whether very early-stage or more established, innovative companies are constantly on the lookout for new customers, trusted partners and key investors. For a strong network, both at home and abroad. For relevant knowledge and expertise. If they could find that in one place, too, then all the better.

Parx Plastics: From a co-working desk to the stock exchange  

Parx Plastics: From a co-working desk to the stock exchange  

Plastic is all around us – from our homes, cars and phones, to disposable water bottles, food packaging, and even our dental fillings. Avoiding just about every contact with it is, thus, rather unrealistic. Yet, while a lot has been said about the negative impact of plastic on people’s health and the environment, there is now a way to make it a lot safer. 

The Third Industrial Revolution is Here — At Fab@CIC.

Drop in for a hot coffee or a pastry at Render Coffee, and the whirr of the espresso machine won’t be the only buzz you hear. You’ll likely also see and hear a digital fabricator or two laser-cutting a rough, miniature prototype for a new chair, building a dental model for a custom oral retainer, or simply “printing” a beautiful piece of digital art. You might also hear the buzz of designers, entrepreneurs, educators, and other innovators – coffee in hand – collaborating across disciplines and sharing skills with each other.

Welcome to Fab@CIC, a digital fabrication lab and community providing an open platform for people to support each other in their efforts to make new things. Powered by CIC Boston, Fab Foundation, and Render Coffee, Fab@CIC is a fabrication lab, yes, but we’re more than that. We’re one of more than 1,000 “Fab Labs” in 78 countries around the globe providing space in which the technological future of personal fabrication and manufacturing can be tested and tried. We’re bringing together innovators from across the region to collaborate, as well as connecting our local design and startup communities with a rapidly flattening global business network.

To understand the significance of what we’re doing at Fab@CIC, one must understand the era in which we are now living. Technology historians say we’re on the precipice of a Third Industrial Revolution. The first American Industrial Revolution, born in the mill towns of Massachusetts in the late 18th century, launched the transition from handmade products to machine-powered manufacturing. The Second Industrial Revolution, which ran roughly from 1870-1914, involved another rapid ramp-up in industrialization behind mass-production of steel and the use of interchangeable machine parts.

This Third Industrial Revolution, sometimes called the Digital Revolution, involves the digitizing of how we make things. And like the first Industrial Revolution, this digital revolution we’re experiencing now was born in Massachusetts. Futurists see a day when rather than producing something in one place and shipping it thousands of miles away to be used, communities are producing more of what they use locally in fabrication labs.

Here at CIC Boston, our fabrication lab is a place where designers and entrepreneurs – really, anyone in Boston – can experiment and create in a supportive and collaborative environment. Technology available to the public in Fab@CIC includes 3D printing, laser cutting, CNC milling, vinyl cutting, soldering and electronics, and large format printing — skills that should not be hijacked by the scientific elite.

“We want to democratize access to the tools needed to invent the next generation of manufacturing and personal fabrication,” says Julia Hansen, one of Fab@CIC’s managers. “Everyone should be able to take part in shaping our physical world. We love great coffee, too.”

In the coming months, this blog will unpack some of the ways in which digital fabrication is being used here at Fab@CIC to design products that will improve lives around the world. We hope these stories – like Fab@CIC itself – will inspire someone who didn’t know she could make something, connect our work to the global Fab Lab movement, or link a product conceived in Boston to a market beyond the city limits. We hope you’ll check in here regularly, because, as we believe at Fab@CIC, the unexpected unfolds when new technology and creativity meet.

This post was written by CIC Member and Fab@CIC Contributor, Steve Holt.

DashTag: Bridging the online and offline world for athletes

DashTag: Bridging the online and offline world for athletes

Young people nowadays are brought up with a smartphone in their hand. They’re online and they’re on social media. They play games and share their experiences with their virtual friends. Yet, more often than not, there’s a certain disconnect between what they do and achieve in the online world and what they do and achieve offline, and vice versa.

Moving from Idea to Minimum Viable Product: Enroute Hustle

This guest post was written by Varun Bihani, CTO of Galaxy Weblinks and CIC Cambridge member.

Building the MVP the right way

After ages of working on the idea and dreaming the dream (impostor syndrome is cruel, ain’t it?), you have decided to go ahead for the MVP. You have a clear idea of what it should do and how you want it to look. The narrative is ready. All good and great. Your obvious next step–to get ready for shipping.

You need to get the idea in the hands of the real user for validation. To ship a product soon is to complete half the race. Easy? Kinda sorta. How are you going to do it? By getting the MVP out soon.

Now, before getting all hyped up with the jargon, here is the thing: an MVP is a highly misconstrued concept.

A. It is not your final product. Your MVP is not what you give to all your beta users.

B. It is not just basic wireframes or prototype. It is not non-functional or purposeless.

Simply put, the MVP is your idea turned into a product with all the ‘minimum necessary’ features providing ‘maximum value’. The latter is the key ingredient. You have to decide on what to keep and what not to keep because the primary aim is to ensure optimal tangibility and functionality.

It’s all about decisions and iteration. What you choose is what the product becomes. Your MVP needs to have some key characteristics. Here is a quick checklist:

  • it should serve one–just one–specific audience
  • it solves at least one problem
  • it has a functional and usable UX (does not need to be aesthetically pleasing)
  • it can be built and launched quickly

Have you completed this checklist? Great! Here’s what you do next:

A. Brainstorm your idea

What, again? Well, yes! But hear me out. This is not the I-will-stay-awake-untill-I-get-a-revolution-out ninja brainstorming. It’s time to get out of the bubble and talk to people. People who think like you, people who might shun the idea, people who are your customers, and people who might help you build the product (take deep breaths because that is almost too many people to talk to). Get your idea out and start conversing about it.

You need this feedback to refine the blueprint. Sit with other entrepreneurs and discuss your initial challenges. Speak to prospective customers and ask them about their problems and desires. The more you iterate in this zone (let’s label it the ‘buffer zone’), the better it is for later stages.

 

B. Find a techie

There are two ways to go about it. You can either hire a development team or you can get a co-founder & CTO. Finding the right person or team will take time. Do not try to save money here. First of all, you need someone who gets your vision. You will need absolute synchronicity to go ahead with the technical partner. Find people who share your zeal.

Their expertise and technical skill are crucial for further consultancy. Even if you know the nitty gritty of coding and design, getting the right techies on-board is important for technical feasibility. They will help with making better decisions about technology and a proper development schedule. They can point you in a better direction, you can define budgets clearly, and you will stick to the timeline.

 

C. Budget, budget, budget

You are going to spend money. In fact, quite a good sum of money. Better do it wisely. Design a milestone blueprint and allocate funds accordingly.  Your expenses will include the legal costs, fee for technical assistance, product development costs, and sundry expenses. Anything that does not directly help the MVP should be removed from the loop.

Money is no cakewalk. Be extremely wary of what you choose to be the source. Be more aware of which channels get a portion of your share.. Only overburden yourself if you have a knack for constant regret and constant fuss and stress.

 

D. Iterate like your life depends on it

This is a brilliant life hack that seeps right into the development process. Follow the Build-Measure-Learn routine. Get the first draft of the MVP out soon and lock in the first development cycle. Past this, get to alpha testing, and begin the fine tuning. The more you analyse and iterate, the better your MVP is. Build user stories, evaluate performance, spot the discrepancies, and work on it.

It is not an easy loop but a very crucial one, and the one worth spending time on. Conduct functionality tests, usability tests, and a funnel analysis. You will have areas to work on and specific sections to improve. You will need complete coordination with the technical team and a lot of patience. Issues will pop up at the last second and you will need real-time iteration.

 

E. Don’t jump in the jeopardy

Your MVP looks ready and you are hyperventilating. There is panting and breathing and you cannot contain the joy. You want to send the product out there into the universe to rise and shine. Hold the thought, and count to 10 (okay to 50 if you are *that* excited). Do not jump in for the roll-out. Rather, gather your trusted peeps and let them test the product. Take feedback, know the flaws, tell the technical team to fix all the bugs, and let a quick QA happen.

This is the most important step.This ensures functionality for initial customers and a perfect user experience. When you take feedback from real users, you can make substantive improvements in the comprehensive blueprint. Your MVP should drive the product ahead. Take two steps back if it’s not.

Next up, we discuss the elephant in the room: The Pitch. Getting ready for putting your idea out there, showing up, shipping the MVP, and moving ahead. The struggle is real but so is the adrenaline rush!

I am Varun Bihani, CTO at Galaxy Weblinks Inc. I have been in the business for a good 15 years and it has been an exhilarating gig. I love working with startups and hearing new ideas. You can find me in Boston around CIC. I like my coffee strong :)

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act for Start-Ups and Emerging Growth Companies

This guest post was written by Kevin P. Martin, Jr., CPA and managing director of KPM.

Happy New Year!

As you’ve certainly heard by now, just about 10 days ago, President Trump signed into law H.R. 1, the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,” a sweeping tax reform package that promises to entirely change the tax landscape for you, your investors and your start-up or emerging growth company. Only time will tell whether the new law fosters or inhibits technology and innovation. What we do know already is that the law is going to challenge us in many ways, including how we balance, overall, lower tax rates with “doing the right thing” like investing in research and drugs for rare diseases. 

I’m guessing whether you braved the cold on New Year’s Eve and met up with friends or whether you sat home, worked and binged on TV reruns and Chinese food, it’s likely that you pondered at least one tax reform question: What’s this mean for my company? Do I have the right entity structure? Am I now going to get the benefit of those NOL’s? Am I going to lose that foreign investor? How about R&D, is it in or is it out? And the list goes on and on…

There are lots and lots of business tax changes under the new tax law, including a reduction in the corporate tax rate to a flat 21% rate; a 5-year write-off period for R&D expenses; a limitation on the deduction for business interest, and an elimination of the domestic production activities deduction. I’m not going to hit every issue but I am going to highlight those hot topics for which CEO’s, CFO’s and entrepreneurs are stopping me in the halls and at community tables to discuss.

  • The very good news is that the final version of the legislation has preserved the research and development (“R&D”) tax credit, which was made permanent in the Protecting Americans against Tax Hikes (“PATH”) Act of 2015. At the same time, we need to be mindful about how those credits are calculated and the ways in which the new tax law will directly or indirectly affect the taxpayers claiming those credits.
     
  • Corporate tax rates have been reduced from a maximum rate of 35% to a flat 21% and the corporate alternative minimum tax (“AMT”) has been repealed. For tax years beginning after 2017 and before 2022, the AMT credit is refundable and can offset regular tax liability in an amount equal to 50% (100% for tax years beginning in 2021) of the excess of the minimum tax credit for the tax year over the amount of the credit allowable for the year against regular tax liability. That’s a mouthful but from a basic, R&D perspective, the AMT repeal removes the AMT restriction on corporations which has long prevented them from utilizing R&D tax credits to offset regular tax liability. 
     
  • Congress passed The Orphan Drug Act in 1983 to provide a better incentive for companies that are willing to embark on the development of orphan drugs (for diseases that affect fewer than 200,000 people). Instead of calculating the benefit for orphan drug development using the rules under IRC section 41 for the R&D tax credit, the Orphan Drug Act provided for a tax credit of 50% of clinical testing expenses (“CTEs”) under IRC Section 45C. Under the new law, the OD tax credit will be reduced to 25% of a company’s costs related to clinical trials for developing rare disease treatments. We are getting lots and lots of feedback here and what we are hearing is that patient groups fear that without the 50 percent tax credit, drug companies will cut back on developing drugs for rare diseases and focus on more common ailments. What we yet to fully understand is the new, optimal inflection point of lower rates, the lower OD credit, the R&D credit and the repeal of AMT that will continue to spur medical innovation.
     
  • The new law has repealed the “domestic production activities deduction.” Section 199 may still be claimed for any open tax years beginning before January 1, 2018. Thinking out loud, taxpayers with production or service activities that are within the scope of Section 199 should consider claiming the Section 199 deduction for current years or possibly reviewing claims made in prior tax years and filing amended returns where applicable.
     
  • Are you doing software development? For tax years beginning after December 31, 2021 taxpayers will be required to treat research or experimental expenditures as chargeable to a capital account and amortized over 5 years (and 15 years in the case of foreign research). Specified R&E expenditures subject to capitalization include costs for software development, but not costs for land or for depreciable or depletable property used in connection with the research or experimentation.
     
  •  Big capital needs? For property placed in service in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, the maximum amount a taxpayer may expense under Code Section 179 is increased to $1 million, and the phase-out threshold is increased to $2.5 million.
     
  • Except for companies with an average gross receipts of $25 million or less during a 3-year look-back period, for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, businesses are subject to a disallowance of a deduction for “net interest expense” in excess of 30% of the business’s adjusted taxable income. The net interest expense disallowance is determined at the tax filer level. There is a special rule that applies to pass-through entitles, which requires the determination to be made at the entity level, for example, at the partnership level instead of the partner level. As you legally set up your new venture, depending on many variables, good entity selection is still ever so important. And to make it just a little tougher to digest, for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017 and before January 1, 2022, adjusted taxable income is computed without regard to deductions allowable for depreciation, amortization, or depletion and without the former Code Section 199 deduction as discussed above.
     
  • Stock options…now I’ve got your attention! Let’s face it, options are a big part of compensation methodologies.  The Act creates a new Section 83(i) and permits eligible employees of a private corporation to elect to delay federal income taxes arising on an option exercise or restricted stock unit (“RSU”) settlement for up to 5 years, subject to early acceleration if there are certain triggering events. “Excluded employees" who are ineligible from using this election include CEOs and CFOs, and individuals who are or were 1% owners or one of the top four, highest paid officers at any time during the last 10 years. There’s a lot more to it but the new rules apply to option exercises and RSU settlements after December 31, 2017.
     
  • If you’re a start-up, there’s a good chance you’ve got some net operating losses (NOL’s) from business activities in a prior year. For NOLs arising in tax years ending after December 31, 2017, the two-year carryback and the special carryback provisions are repealed, but a two-year carryback applies in the case of certain losses incurred in the trade or business of farming (yes, we’ve got some farming tech). And here’s the kicker: For losses arising in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, the NOL deduction is limited to 80% of taxable income (determined without regard to the deduction). Carryovers to other years are adjusted to take into account this limitation, and, generally, NOLs can be carried forward indefinitely.
     
  • Got employees? For wages paid in tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, but not beginning after December 31, 2019, the new law allows businesses to claim a general business credit equal to 12.5% of the amount of wages paid to qualifying employees during any period in which such employees are on family and medical leave (FMLA) if the rate of payment is 50% of the wages normally paid to an employee. The credit is increased by 0.25 percentage points (but not above 25%) for each percentage point by which the rate of payment exceeds 50%.
     
  • For amounts incurred or paid after December 31, 2017, deductions for entertainment expenses are disallowed, eliminating the subjective determination of whether such expenses are sufficiently business related; the current 50% limit on the deductibility of business meals is expanded to meals provided through an in-house cafeteria or otherwise on the premises of the employer; and deductions for employee transportation fringe benefits (e.g., parking and mass transit) are denied, but the exclusion from income for such benefits received by an employee is retained. In addition, no deduction is allowed for transportation expenses that are the equivalent of commuting for employees (e.g., between the employee’s home and the workplace), except as provided for the safety of the employee.  What does this mean?  Thou shalt host business meetings in coffee shops and thou shalt walk from your loft to work!
     
  • There is a new 20% qualified business income deduction for certain owners of flow-through entities (such as partnerships, limited liability companies and S corporations) and sole proprietorships - through 2025.  Lets just say, like life...it’s complicated.
     
  • The dividends received deduction (“DRD”) has been reduced for companies owning significant equity in other companies. We’ve got a bunch of these types of companies. Currently, if ownership constitutes less than 20% or greater than 20%, but less than 80%, the deduction is equal to 70% and 80%, respectively.  The new legislation reduces those deductions to 50% and 65%, respectively.  This will affect dividend declaration policies made by corporations.
     
  •  The Code occasionally has provided various incentive programs aimed at encouraging economic growth and investment in distressed communities by providing Federal tax benefits to businesses located within designated boundaries. The new law provides temporary deferral of inclusion in gross income for capital gains reinvested in a “qualified opportunity fund” and the permanent exclusion of capital gains from the sale or exchange of an investment in the qualified opportunity fund.

Lastly, we work with a number of companies that have foreign investment or are wholly-owned by foreign entities. The new law contains a number of provisions that relate to foreign dividends, the expansion of the definition of “US  shareholder,” base erosion anti-abuse tax (“BEATS”), denial of deductions relating to certain related party payments and limitations of income shifting through intangible property transfers (“transfer pricing”).

Now, I’m betting you wish you had one more drink on New Year’s Eve! Will the new tax law allow tech companies to spur innovation and meet their growth potential? We are still scratching our heads. Let’s face it, start-ups and early growth companies face unique challenges – they need big upfront investment, they incur operating losses in those early years, they aren’t getting the immediate benefit of a reduction in the corporate tax rate, they are tight on cash and often choose to compensate key team members through stock options and they are dependent on R&D to push forward their ideas.

There’s a lot going on under the new law and we are still working through the text ourselves, particularly the foreign investment provisions.  There’s likely to be a technical corrections bill coming which should add some clarification, and likely lots more confusion.  We’ve been working with companies like yours for over 50 years and we would be delighted to guide you through the new law and what you should be doing now…and later.

Kevin P. Martin, Jr. is the Managing Director of Kevin P. Martin & Associates, P.C, a Boston-based CPA and consulting firm specializing in start-up and early stage tech, biotech and life sciences companies. Kevin spends most of his time advising clients, growing companies, putting business ideas to work, giving lectures and can be reached always at kmartinjr@kpm-us.com.
 

SkyEcho: taking weather forecasting to the next level

SkyEcho: taking weather forecasting to the next level

The weather is an unpredictable thing – and especially so in the Netherlands. From sun and clear skies in one moment, to clouds, wind and rain only minutes later, short-term weather change has been difficult to pinpoint with the technology currently out there. Yet, that may not be the case for much longer.

SkyEcho, led by co-founders Yann Dufournet, Igor Stepanov and Tobias Otto, is on a mission to make rainfall- and storm monitoring more accurate and timely. A lot more accurate and timely, that is.

"University City Science Center shifts focus ahead of move to new HQ"

"University City Science Center shifts focus ahead of move to new HQ"

Business incubation runs deep in the University City Science Center’s veins. President and CEO Stephen Tang would argue it pioneered the modern-day concept — the highest award in the business incubation space is named after Randall Whaley, the Science Center’s former president, for example — but now, a new partnership with the Cambridge Innovation Center, or CIC, is changing the Science Center’s game.

Weighing in on Miami’s entrepreneurial ecosystem

Weighing in on Miami’s entrepreneurial ecosystem

Two years ago, Cambridge Innovation Center announced it would be expanding to Miami, taking most of the space in the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park, which is now called Converge Miami. And at that time it made a bold prediction: that it would quickly become a hub for entrepreneurship in Miami.

CIC Miami Launches Corporate Innovation Program

CIC SEEKS TO CONNECT THE REGION’S CAPITAL, IDEAS, AND TALENT BY INTRODUCING MIAMI’S ENTREPRENEURSHIP COMMUNITY TO THE CITY’S ESTABLISHED CORPORATIONS

Boeing chose to locate its Ventures team near CIC to get the best of both worlds: access the culture, energy and density of CIC while maintaining our identity as the leading aerospace company. It wasn’t enough to simply move out of Boeing’s campus, we needed to move into a new eco-system in order to create a new culture.
— Timothy Noonan, Vice President at The Boeing Company

We invite you to join a community that will encourage your organization to foster innovation and connect with external opportunities. Participation in our Corporate Innovation Program will place your enterprise within CIC & the nation’s number-one-ranked aggregate community of startup activity according to The Brookings Institution.  

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There are boundless resources to share between startups and corporates, but there are several barriers preventing successful communication and collaboration between them.   

In order to strengthen the Converge Miami innovation district, it is imperative that we create a plurality of stakeholders by partnering with entrepreneurs, investors, universities, and corporations across all industry verticals.

Corporate Support

CIC Miami invites corporations to plug into a quality talent pool, engage with growing entrepreneurs, gain perspective on research and technologies that can be scaled for their company, and connect with the local community.

Our network provides programmatic resources on topics ranging from how to build your company culture and maximize employee engagement to designing effective workspaces and streamlining processes. There is also a strategic focus on Corporate Social Responsibility programming and mapping out connection opportunities with Latin America.

Participation in our Corporate Innovation Program includes:

PERSONAL INTRODUCTIONS TO RELEVANT STARTUPS AND ENTREPRENEURS ACROSS FINTECH, EDUCATION TECH, HEALTH TECH, LIFE SCIENCES, TRADE & LOGISTICS, AND OTHER SECTORS

COMPLIMENTARY CO-WORKING MEMBERSHIP FOR THREE MONTHS FOR TWO MEMBERS

COMPLIMENTARY EVENT & MEETING SPACE

PUBLIC-FACING PROGRAMMING, EVENTS, AND BRANDING

INTRODUCTIONS TO AND FACILITATED ENGAGEMENT WITH LATIN AMERICAN STARTUPS

ACCESS TO PROGRAMMING: CAREER FAIRS, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, NETWORKING, MENTORING OPPORTUNITIES, WELLNESS, ETC.

ACCESS TO DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL CO-WORKING SITES

FULLY STOCKED KITCHENS

HIGH-SPEED INTERNET

WEEKLY COMMUNITY EVENTS

MAIL & GUEST RECEPTION SERVICES (COMMERCIAL BUSINESS ADDRESS)

UNMETERED PRINTING/COPYING

24/7 BUILDING ACCESS

CIC has provided Nestle Purina an opportunity to engage in a meaningful way in the innovation community in St. Louis. This has enabled our associates to get outside the “corporate” walls, pilot new ways of working, incubate new business opportunities and engage in many of the offerings found in CIC’s co-working space.
— Brian Lester, Director of Marketing & Innovation at Nestle Purina

OUR CORPORATE CLIENTS ACROSS CIC LOCATIONS HAVE INCLUDED:

  • Citigroup
  • L’Oreal
  • Square
  • 3M
  • Bank of America
  • Express Scripts
  • Mastercard
  • Nestle Purina
  • Deloitte
  • Apple
  • PwC

...and many more!

CIC  HOUSES 1,500+ COMPANIES AND OVER $7B IN VENTURE CAPITAL PRIVATE EQUITY FUNDING WITHIN OUR PROPERTIES.

space@miami.cic.us  (305) 503-7751

University of Miami and CIC Miami Partner to Establish South Florida's First Shared Wet Lab for Early Stage Biomedical Startups

University of Miami and CIC Miami Partner to Establish South Florida's First Shared Wet Lab for Early Stage Biomedical Startups

The University of Miami and the Cambridge Innovation Center in Miami (CIC Miami) have
partnered to establish South Florida's first shared wet lab space for early stage biomedical startups. Years in the making, it is the final piece of the puzzle to attracting and fostering biomedical discoveries in the South Florida region.

Announcing CIC Providence! (+ an update on CIC Philadelphia)

CIC is thrilled to announce that we just broke ground in Providence, Rhode Island on a new innovation complex. Partners on the project include Brown University and Johnson & Johnson.  

CIC Providence will be situated in a brand new building in the historic Jewelry District, an easy walk to the Amtrak station, Brown and Rhode Island School of Design. We will have a gorgeous innovation space, as well as a gathering space modeled after our District Hall project in Boston.

#CICGetsGreen: Where does our waste go?  

#CICGetsGreen: Where does our waste go?  

In honor of green industry and innovation month, we’d like to shine a quick spotlight on CIC’s internal efforts to go green!

Two small but mighty CIC crews, the Planeteers and the Kitchens Team, are jointly leading a grassroots effort to institutionalize the 3 “R’s” – Reduce, Reuse, & Recycle – within CIC’s day-to-day operations. Below you will find a quick reference guide on some of the current initiatives.